COURSE OBJECTIVES

Dry Needling: Implementing a Specialized Approach to Pain and Dysfunction – Course One

Upon completion of this introductory level course (part one of a two part series), the therapist will be able to:

  1. Identify four similarities between Travell and Simons Trigger Point Injections and Karl Lewit’s use of “Dry” Needling.

  2. Describe two similarities and two differences between Traditional Acupuncture, Western Medical Acupuncture, and Dry Needling.

  3. Describe the specific dry needling regulations of the state practice act in which the student is licensed.

  4. List three components of the APTA Position on Dry Needling by a Physical Therapist.

  5. List three examples of each type of input (Cognitive, Sensory, and Motivational-Affective) into the Neuromatrix Model of Pain.

  6. Identify two of the five Travell and Simons major criteria for diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome and two of the three Travell and Simons minor criteria for diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome.

  7. List the three diagnostic criteria from the American College of Rheumatology for fibromyalgia.

  8. Describe two similarities between the Motor End Plate Hypothesis and the Energy Crisis Theory.

  9. List three effects dry needling has on the chemical composition of trigger points.

  10. List three effects dry needling has on the motor end plate electrical activity of trigger points.

  11. Analyze four research articles including the Physiologic Effects of Dry Needling by Cagne (2013), Dry Needling vs Acupuncture: The Ongoing Debate by Kehua (2015), Adverse Events Following Trigger Point Dry Needling by Brady (2014), and Pertinent Dry Needling Considerations for Minimizing Adverse Events by Halle (2016).

  12. List three examples of the pain inhibiting effect dry needling has on the central nervous system.

  13. List the eleven Occupational Safety and Health Administration Bloodborne Pathogen Standards.

  14. Identify five indications for dry needling from the APTA Educational Resource Paper titled “Description of Dry Needling in Clinical Practice.”

  15. Identify five relative contraindications to dry needling from the APTA Educational Resource Paper titled “Description of Dry Needling in Clinical Practice.”

  16. Identify five absolute contraindications to dry needling from the APTA Educational Resource Paper titled “Description of Dry Needling in Clinical Practice.”

  17. List five potential risks associated with dry needling.

  18. Successfully categorize five adverse events into the appropriate category (Mild, Significant, and Serious) identified by White in his 2001 study published in Acupuncture Med.

  19. Implement an emergency action plan after recognizing two of the five symptoms of a pneumothorax. 

  20. Implement an emergency action plan after recognizing ANY serious adverse event as classified by White in his 2001 study published in Acupuncture Med.

  21. Perform dry needling to 22 selected muscles of the hip, thigh, and lower leg safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  22. Perform dry needling to 12 selected muscles of the lumbar and cervical spine safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures. 

  23. Perform dry needling to 6 selected muscles of the shoulder and shoulder girdle safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  24. Perform dry needling to 10 selected muscles of the upper extremity and forearm safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  25. Demonstrate accurate and defensible documentation of each of the 50 dry needling treatments performed during Course One which includes documentation of informed consent, pre-procedure time out, alcohol wipe down, site of treatment, needle selection, patient position, patient response, and any adverse events.

 

Proficiency Standard:

Demonstrate proficiency by passing a comprehensive check off exam that includes description of technique, specific description of anatomy, specific precautions, and integrating proficient needling technique on three randomly selected muscles.

Demonstrate proficiency by passing a comprehensive 50 question multiple choice examination covering content from Course One of the Two Course series with a minimum passing score of 80%.

Continuing Education Approval:

Certified by FSBPT ProCERT for 27 CCUs

Approved by Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Louisiana State Boards of Physical Therapy for

27 contact hours

Approved by Tennessee Physical Therapy Association for 2.7 CEUS/27 contact hours of Class 1 Continuing Education (TPTA Approval Number 2020-59)

The Illinois Chapter Continuing Education Committee has certified that this course meets the criteria for approval of Continuing Educational offerings established by The Illinois Physical Therapy Association for 27 hours. 

MS Dry Needling Education is approved by the Board of Certification, Inc to offer continuing education to Certified Athletic Trainers

Eligibility:
This course is designed for licensed therapists and athletic trainers who are allowed to perform dry needling in their practice act and jurisdiction.

Dry Needling: Implementing a Specialized Approach to Pain and Dysfunction – Course Two

Upon completion of this intermediate level course (part two of a two part series), the therapist will be able to:

  1. Analyze, according to Sackett’s hierarchy, three physical therapy (non-acupuncture) peer reviewed journal articles identified in course references on the effectiveness of dry needling.

  2. Discuss twelve physical therapy (non-acupuncture) peer reviewed journal articles identified in course references on the effectiveness of dry needling.

  3. Correctly perform dry needling to 7 selected muscles of the shoulder girdle safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  4. Correctly perform dry needling to 4 selected muscles of the thoracic spine safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  5. Correctly perform dry needling to 4 selected muscles of the craniofacial region safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  6. Correctly perform dry needling to 4 selected muscles of the hand safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  7. Correctly perform dry needling to 4 selected muscles of the foot safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  8. Correctly perform dry needling to 3 selected muscles over lung fields via superficial and rib block techniques.

  9. List the four components of the Wainner et. al Cervical Radiculopathy Clinical Cluster.

  10. List four of the six components of the Tseng et. al Cervical Manipulation Clinical Prediction Rule to aide with treatment intervention selection.

  11. List the four classifications for neck pain from the Orthopedic Section of the APTA’s Clinical Practice Guidelines.

  12. Given the findings of an evaluation of an adult with chronic neck pain, the therapist will independently justify the integration of dry needling into the treatment program.

  13. Correctly perform dry needling to 6 selected muscles as part of a cervicalgia/cervical radiculopathy treatment intervention safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  14. List four of the six components of the Cleland et. al Thoracic Manipulation Clinical Prediction Rule to aide with treatment intervention selection.

  15. Correctly perform dry needling to 6 selected muscles as part of a scapular pain/thoracicalgia treatment intervention safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  16. The therapist, given a case scenario, will be able to explain three components of the Park et. al Clinical Cluster for shoulder pain.

  17. List three of the four components of the Michner et. al Clinical Cluster for subacromial impingement.

  18. Given the findings of an evaluation of an adult with shoulder pain, the therapist will independently justify the integration of dry needling into the treatment program.

  19. Correctly perform dry needling to 4 selected muscles as part of a shoulder pain treatment intervention safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  20. List the six classifications for low back pain from the Orthopedic Section of the APTA’s Clinical Practice Guidelines.

  21. List four of the five components of the Flynn et. al Lumbar Manipulation Clinical Prediction Rule to aide with treatment intervention selection.

  22. List the two components of the Fritz et. al Lumbar Traction Clinical Prediction Rule to aide with treatment intervention selection.

  23. Given the findings of an evaluation of an adult with chronic low back pain, the therapist will independently justify the integration of dry needling into the treatment program.

  24. Correctly perform dry needling to 6 selected muscles as part of a lumbago/lumbar radiculopathy treatment intervention safely and proficiently.

  25. List the four components of the Laslett et. al Test Item Cluster for Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction Provocation Tests.

  26. Given the findings of an evaluation of an adult with sacroiliac joint dysfunction, the therapist will independently justify the integration of dry needling into the treatment program.

  27. Correctly perform dry needling to 4 selected muscles as part of a sacroiliac joint dysfunction treatment intervention safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  28. List four of the seven components of the American College of Rheumatology OA Diagnostic Criteria for the Knee.

  29. Given the findings of an evaluation of an adult with knee pain, the therapist will independently justify the integration of dry needling into the treatment program.

  30. Correctly perform dry needling to 4 selected muscles as part of a knee pain treatment intervention safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  31. Given the findings of an evaluation of an adult with iliotibial band friction syndrome, the therapist will independently justify the integration of dry needling into the treatment program.

  32. Correctly perform dry needling to 4 selected muscles as part of an iliotibial band friction syndrome treatment intervention safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  33. List five of the eight Key Clinical Findings for plantar fasciitis according to the Orthopedic Section of the APTA’s Clinical Practice Guidelines for Plantar Fasciitis.

  34. Given the findings of an evaluation of an adult with plantar fasciitis, the therapist will independently justify the integration of dry needling into the treatment program.

  35. Correctly perform dry needling to 5 selected muscles as part of a plantar fasciitis treatment intervention safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  36. Discuss accurate documentation of each of the 34 dry needling treatments performed during Course Two which includes documentation of informed consent, pre-procedure time out, alcohol wipe down, site of treatment, needle selection, patient position, patient response, and any adverse events.

 

Proficiency Standard:

Demonstrate proficiency by passing a comprehensive check off exam that includes analyzing a case study and implementing an appropriate treatment strategy on a partner utilizing techniques learned from Course One and Course Two of the series.

Demonstrate proficiency by passing a comprehensive 50 question multiple choice examination covering content from Course Two of the Two Course series with a minimum passing score of 80%.

Continuing Education Approval:

Certified by FSBPT ProCERT for 24 CCUs

Approved by Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Louisiana State Boards of Physical Therapy for

27 contact hours

Approved by Tennessee Physical Therapy Association for 2.7 CEUS/27 contact hours of Class 1 Continuing Education (TPTA Approval Number 2020-60)

The Illinois Chapter Continuing Education Committee has certified that this course meets the criteria for approval of Continuing Educational offerings established by The Illinois Physical Therapy Association for 27 hours. 

MS Dry Needling Education is approved by the Board of Certification, Inc to offer continuing education to Certified Athletic Trainers

Eligibility:
This course is designed for licensed  therapists and athletic trainers who are allowed to perform dry needling in their practice act and jurisdiction.

Pelvic Floor Dry Needling: Implementing a Specialized Approach to Pelvic Pain and Dysfunction 

Upon completion of this advanced level course, the therapist will be able to:

  1. List three overlapping conditions that frequently occur with Chronic Pelvic Pain.

  2. List the three most commonly associated psychological disorders that can occur with Chronic     

  3. Identify the hallmark diagnostic indicator of Myofascial Pelvic Pain.

  4. Describe two similarities between an active and a latent trigger point.

  5. List three effects dry needling has on the chemical composition of trigger points.

  6. List three effects dry needling has on the motor end plate electrical activity of trigger points.

  7. List the results of the increased responsiveness of nociceptors to either normal or sub-threshold afferent inputs that occurs during Central Sensitization.

  8. Discuss viscerosomatic convergence and how persistent noxious visceral input can establish a     sensitized spinal segment producing areas of allodynia, hyperalgesia, and referred pain with associated somatic dysfunction.

  9. Discuss how peripheral and central sensitization affects interneurons that connect to alpha and gamma motor neurons, leading to segmental overactivity of pelvic floor muscles, spasm, and contracture.

  10. Describe three effects trigger points have on muscles of the pelvic floor.

  11. List three of the most common diagnoses associated with dyspareunia.

  12. List the types of pelvic floor myofascial dysfunction associated with provoked vestibulodynia.

  13. List the hallmark symptoms of interstitial cystitis and the interplay myofascial pelvic pain and high tone pelvic floor has on the disease process.

  14. List the four National Institute of Health classifications for Prostatitis.

  15. According to the Rome IV Criteria, list the three classifications of rectal pain syndromes.

  16. List two predisposing factors for Coccydynia.

  17. Describe myofascial pelvic pain referral patterns for 19 muscles associated with the pelvic floor.

  18. Identify five indications for dry needling from the APTA Educational Resource Paper titled “Description of Dry Needling in Clinical Practice.”

  19. Identify five relative contraindications to dry needling from the APTA Educational Resource Paper titled “Description of Dry Needling in Clinical Practice.”

  20. Identify five absolute contraindications to dry needling from the APTA Educational Resource Paper titled “Description of Dry Needling in Clinical Practice.”

  21. Describe the clinical implications of performing dry needling and electrical stimulation during pregnancy.

  22. Correctly perform dry needling to 4 selected muscles of the posterior hip safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  23. Correctly perform dry needling to 5 selected muscles of the anterior and medial thigh safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  24. Correctly perform dry needling to 3 selected muscles of the sacrum and coccyx safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  25. Correctly perform dry needling to 3 selected muscles of the anal triangle safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  26. Correctly perform dry needling to 2 selected muscles of the urogenital triangle safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  27. Given a case scenario of a patient with sacral and tail bone pain, the therapist will independently justify the integration of dry needling into the treatment program.

  28. Correctly perform dry needling with electrical stimulation to 3 selected muscles as part of a sacral and tail bone pain treatment intervention safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  29. Given a case scenario of a patient with anorectal pain, the therapist will independently justify the integration of dry needling into the treatment program.

  30. Correctly perform dry needling with electrical stimulation to 4 selected muscles as part of an anorectal pain treatment intervention safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

  31. Given a case scenario of a patient with urogenital pain, the therapist will independently justify the integration of dry needling into the treatment program.

  32. Correctly perform dry needling with electrical stimulation to 4 selected muscles as part of a urogenital pain treatment intervention safely and proficiently which includes proper selection of needle, proper selection of depth, identifying regional precautions, and avoiding vital structures.

 

Proficiency Standard:
1. Demonstrate proficiency by passing a comprehensive 25 question multiple choice examination
with a minimum passing score of 80%.
 

Course Prerequisites:
1. Successful completion of at least an introductory level dry needling course. Any accredited dry
needling course will satisfy this prerequisite.
2. Successful completion of an accredited level 1 pelvic health/pelvic floor course such as Herman
and Wallace or APTA.
3. Students must submit evidence of successful completion via a course certificate of both
prerequisites prior to participation in the course.

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© 2017 Mississippi Dry needling education  |  luke@msdryneedling.com

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